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Divergent media EditReady

For example, your camera may store a “Creation date” in a variety of places throughout the file. If the values within the key don’t match, EditReady will display “Conflicting Values” and provide a disclosure triangle to reveal the individual entries. If you’d like to unify all of these entries with a single value, click the checkbox to the right of the value you’d like to preserve.

Any other value will be replaced. Metadata Window Metadata Window If your camera includes GPS data in the metadata, those fields will have a “pin” icon, allowing you to view the clip location on a map. Map visualization Some metadata is intended only for use by the camera manufacturer during troubleshooting, so may appear as simply a string of numbers or letters within EditReady. Editing Metadata To edit an entry, simply double click and begin typing. Depending on the field, EditReady may enforce requirements on the type of information you can enter for example, date fields may only contain a valid date.

Adding Metadata To add a new entry click the “add metadata” icon in the upper right corner of the Metadata window. You’ll be able to select from a variety of categories and metadata keys. If you’d like to customize this selection, see appendix a. Some metadata keys will restrict the types of data you can enter for example, timecode entries must be valid timecode values.

Adding Metadata Keys that already exist in your file will be disabled from the “add metadata” screen. Removing Metadata To remove a metadata entry, click the minus sign to the right of the entry. Global Metadata EditReady allows you to set metadata across a set of files with a single operation.

This value will be set across all of the target files, and will replace any existing values for that key. Joining Files There are a number of ways in which EditReady can join media, depending on the type of source you’re working with. Manually Joining Files To manually join files, select the files you wish to join within EditReady, and then select “join” from the “clip” menu.

You may also split joins using the “split” command in that menu. EditReady will only allow you to join media if the files all have the same frame size and framerate. If there’s a mismatch, the join menu option will be disabled. This split happens at a low level, so the files need to be recombined before they’re converted. If you only have the MTS files, without the rest of the card metadata, you may still manually join the files see above.

EditReady will attempt to detect whether the files are from a consecutive group, and will take the appropriate action to join them. However, some Canon cameras do split long recordings across multiple files. In these cases, EditReady will attempt to automatically join the files.

Naming Your Files EditReady includes powerful file naming features, so that you can keep track of all the files in your post production pipeline. The popup menu to the right of the “Dest File Name” label is pre-populated with a handful of options. You may, for example, choose to have your output file names match the input file names, or have them be named with an automatically incrementing number.

Naming options Customizing File Names In addition to the presets, you can add additional values from your file’s metadata to the file naming scheme.

When viewing your file’s metadata see the previous chapter , you will notice a small “tag” icon next to each metadata key. Drag that tag to the “dest file name” field to include that metadata element in the destination filename. Dragging the “Reel” tag For example, you may wish to add the “Reel” key and the “Creation date” keys to the existing “auto-increment” entry.

You can drag and drop to rearrange values within the “dest file name” field, and you can type to add characters like dashes or underscores. So, you could easily have all of your output files named ” Reel – CreationDate – Auto-increment. Overwriting Existing Files EditReady will not allow you to proceed if your destination files will overwrite your source files.

In other cases where files will be overwritten, or where there is insufficient metadata to populate a filename, EditReady will alert you and allow you to continue.

File conflict alert Destination Folder You can click the icon to the right of “Dest Folder” to select an output folder for your batch.

That will cause EditReady to store your output files in the same folders as the source files. Please note, EditReady will not allow you to overwrite your source media, so make sure your file naming scheme doesn’t conflict with your existing files.

In all other cases, that dropdown will be disabled. Custom Presets EditReady is an integral part of a post production workflow. To make the usage even more seamless, you can create custom presets that match your workflow needs. Begin by selecting the “custom” preset in the preset dropdown.

You may also choose to pass the input video directly to the output file using the “passthrough” option. This is helpful if you only need to adjust the audio track or metadata of your file.

The “right” choice will be different for each workflow, but in general if your source is already compressed an h file from a GoPro camera for example , the standard ProRes file will be fine.

These choices may be confusing if you’re used to seeing DNxHD listed with a variety of bitrates. EditReady selects the correct bitrate automatically, based on your input file’s resolution and framerate. For a xp24 file, the bitrates are 36, 80 and We strongly recommend using PCM audio with this format. Editing Metadata To edit an entry, simply double click and begin typing. Depending on the field, EditReady may enforce requirements on the type of information you can enter for example, date fields may only contain a valid date.

Adding Metadata To add a new entry click the “add metadata” icon in the upper right corner of the Metadata window. You’ll be able to select from a variety of categories and metadata keys.

If you’d like to customize this selection, see appendix a. Some metadata keys will restrict the types of data you can enter for example, timecode entries must be valid timecode values.

Adding Metadata Keys that already exist in your file will be disabled from the “add metadata” screen. Removing Metadata To remove a metadata entry, click the minus sign to the right of the entry. Global Metadata EditReady allows you to set metadata across a set of files with a single operation. This value will be set across all of the target files, and will replace any existing values for that key. Joining Files There are a number of ways in which EditReady can join media, depending on the type of source you’re working with.

Manually Joining Files To manually join files, select the files you wish to join within EditReady, and then select “join” from the “clip” menu. You may also split joins using the “split” command in that menu. EditReady will only allow you to join media if the files all have the same frame size and framerate. If there’s a mismatch, the join menu option will be disabled.

This split happens at a low level, so the files need to be recombined before they’re converted. If you only have the MTS files, without the rest of the card metadata, you may still manually join the files see above.

EditReady will attempt to detect whether the files are from a consecutive group, and will take the appropriate action to join them. However, some Canon cameras do split long recordings across multiple files. In these cases, EditReady will attempt to automatically join the files.

Naming Your Files EditReady includes powerful file naming features, so that you can keep track of all the files in your post production pipeline. The popup menu to the right of the “Dest File Name” label is pre-populated with a handful of options. You may, for example, choose to have your output file names match the input file names, or have them be named with an automatically incrementing number.

Naming options Customizing File Names In addition to the presets, you can add additional values from your file’s metadata to the file naming scheme. When viewing your file’s metadata see the previous chapter , you will notice a small “tag” icon next to each metadata key.

Drag that tag to the “dest file name” field to include that metadata element in the destination filename. Dragging the “Reel” tag For example, you may wish to add the “Reel” key and the “Creation date” keys to the existing “auto-increment” entry. You can drag and drop to rearrange values within the “dest file name” field, and you can type to add characters like dashes or underscores. So, you could easily have all of your output files named ” Reel – CreationDate – Auto-increment.

Overwriting Existing Files EditReady will not allow you to proceed if your destination files will overwrite your source files. In other cases where files will be overwritten, or where there is insufficient metadata to populate a filename, EditReady will alert you and allow you to continue. File conflict alert Destination Folder You can click the icon to the right of “Dest Folder” to select an output folder for your batch.

That will cause EditReady to store your output files in the same folders as the source files. Please note, EditReady will not allow you to overwrite your source media, so make sure your file naming scheme doesn’t conflict with your existing files. In all other cases, that dropdown will be disabled. Custom Presets EditReady is an integral part of a post production workflow. To make the usage even more seamless, you can create custom presets that match your workflow needs.

Begin by selecting the “custom” preset in the preset dropdown. You may also choose to pass the input video directly to the output file using the “passthrough” option. This is helpful if you only need to adjust the audio track or metadata of your file. The “right” choice will be different for each workflow, but in general if your source is already compressed an h file from a GoPro camera for example , the standard ProRes file will be fine. These choices may be confusing if you’re used to seeing DNxHD listed with a variety of bitrates.

EditReady selects the correct bitrate automatically, based on your input file’s resolution and framerate. For a xp24 file, the bitrates are 36, 80 and We strongly recommend using PCM audio with this format. You can save that preset for reuse later by selecting “save current preset” from the batch menu.

For details on the framerates, frame sizes, and bitrates that DNxHR supports, see Avid’s format table. This setting will automatically select a bitrate high enough to preserve the quality of your source footage without introducing substantial artifacts.

Passthrough will preserve your source audio and is useful if you only wish to make changes to the video component or metadata of your file. This is the recommended option for any editing platform. None Remove the audio entirely. For this reason, the presets are optimized for editing. I really like that the default setting for audio is uncompressed. This is a very smart choice. Clicking the additional options Edit button allows you to apply a LUT to the footage prior to conversion, retime footage, scale footage, adjust H.

You can learn more about a clip by clicking the triangle icon in the top right corner. EditReady was finished in exactly three minutes. Importing these files in Adobe Media Encoder generated this error message. Installing the Dolby codec took seconds… Then this error message appeared.

This can be especially irksome if you had the wrong setting applied when the clips were imported. It took me longer to reset all these compression settings and repoint the destination than it did for Edit Ready to transcode these files. Final results: Edit Ready: Could not open the files AME: Why should we consider using EditReady? You do, if you have an assistant who can prep files for you without tying up your editing system.

You do, if speed is important to you. By off-loading the transcoding process to a separate computer or assistant, the editor is able to focus on editing while files are being prepped for the edit. Keep in mind that LUTs can be compute-intensive, particularly on 4K files. Slower computers or computers with slower graphics cards may have trouble with realtime playback.

For example, a Reel name or even the folder the file is stored in. You can easily monitor the conversion status of each clip — green is done, blue is in-process. EditReady includes a metadata editor which allows you to change metadata associated with each clip or globally for all clips. A HUGE benefit of this is that you are able to change the starting timecode for a clip before converting it!

Metadata may include camera settings like F-Stop, Iris, and Shutter, as well as items like Location if your camera has GPS , media serial numbers, or even diagnostic data. You can open multiple EditReady windows so you can compress files from different sources using different settings all at the same time.

EditReady is not a resource hog. This section of the chip does not report its usage in Activity Monitor.

Divergent media EditReady

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Divergent media EditReady

EditReady: Overview