Rosetta Stone – Learn Dutch (Level 1, 2 & 3 Set)

After practicing the alphabet sounds, we advise language learners to jump right into pronunciations. By far, the best way to figure out how to pronounce these tricky vowels correctly is to practice and get feedback from native speakers like one of our Dutch language tutors. Each lesson includes practical exercises that get you speaking Dutch and working on your pronunciation consistently. Because Dutch is a much more phonetically consistent language than English, Dutch words almost always sound the way they are spelled.

You can use this phonetic knowledge to pronounce long, compound words, that otherwise might be overwhelming. Another leg up you have already is being an English speaker. Dutch is a close relative of both German and English and some say it sits right between the two languages.

Dutch vocabulary is mostly Germanic and incorporates slightly more from the Romance languages than German, but far fewer than English. Consider that 80 of the most common words in English are Germanic in origin. These most basic, most-frequently used words in English and Dutch derive from the same roots, making them extremely similar.

Learn how to ask “Excuse me, where could I find the best stroopwafel? Your browser doesn’t support HTML5 audio. Here is a link to the audio instead. Start with Dutch modal verbs Get rolling with a few of the most commonly used Dutch verbs, which are modal verbs usually used to describe the relationship to a second verb.

Dutch has four modal verbs and while they have some irregular conjugations, learning these verbs can set you up for most basic Dutch sentence structures. The four Dutch modal verbs are: Ik zou graag een stroopwafel willen eten. I would like to eat a stroopwafel. Learn Dutch expressions and greetings The basic conversational building blocks are a great place to start.

Simple phrases like good morning, how are you, etc. Hello Hoe gaat het met je? How are you? Learning Dutch with Rosetta Stone means you are leveraging a trusted language-learning software with over 25 years experience developing language programs that work. Learning the Dutch Alphabet Our first stop on the language-learning journey is the Dutch alphabet.

Standard Dutch has the same 26 letters as the English alphabet. The letter y is also the only letter in the Dutch alphabet that is called by its name: Griekse y Greek y or ypsilon after the Greek letter. Most consonants in Dutch are pronounced roughly the same as English with a few deviations. It is similar to the sound you might make clearing your throat. Try your hand or tongue with these: Practice speaking the following pairs aloud and see if you can hear the difference: Het gaat heel goed It is going really well If you come across an r before the letter g, it usually is silent.

Elsewhere in the word it is pronounced as you would in English, as in regendruppel rain drop with the exception of a few dialects that use the uvular fricative here as well.

Additionally, the Dutch have three consonant combinations where the separate consonants are merged to create a new sound: Pronounce ng as you would in the English words king, long, or string, as in zingen to sing.

In Dutch, in addition to the vowels a, e, i, o, u, and y, there are numerous combined vowels, also called diphthongs. After practicing the alphabet sounds, we advise language learners to jump right into pronunciations.

By far, the best way to figure out how to pronounce these tricky vowels correctly is to practice and get feedback from native speakers like one of our Dutch language tutors. Each lesson includes practical exercises that get you speaking Dutch and working on your pronunciation consistently.

Because Dutch is a much more phonetically consistent language than English, Dutch words almost always sound the way they are spelled. You can use this phonetic knowledge to pronounce long, compound words, that otherwise might be overwhelming. Another leg up you have already is being an English speaker.

Dutch is a close relative of both German and English and some say it sits right between the two languages. Dutch vocabulary is mostly Germanic and incorporates slightly more from the Romance languages than German, but far fewer than English.

Rosetta Stone - Learn Dutch (Level 1, 2 & 3 Set)